Picasso Art Project Technique

 

Picasso Art Project Technique

 
This Picasso art project is an easy way to ease into painting with your students.  
The art technique you are about to see uses only Sharpie markers, crayons, texture plates, colored markers, and water (no paint)
– and looks GREAT!
 
 
 

Drawing a Picasso Face

using a roll & draw to make a black line drawing

Start your Picasso art project by making a Picasso Face using Picasso Face Roll & Draw Activity.

First, students will roll the dice to pick out the features of the face. After students pick out the parts of the face, they can add hair, a neck, and shoulders.

You can use pencils to make the drawing or just jump right into using Sharpie markers when making their Picasso Face drawing since this is an abstract picture, students don’t need to be as concered about making mistakes.

Go over some of the marker lines a second time to thicken them up.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Step 2 - colored marker outline

Colored Marker Outline

After making the drawing with a black permanent marker, outline each area with a colored marker.

 

For the best results:

• Use new washable markers.

• Choose dark colors.

•Go over the outline two times (or more).

 
 
 
 

 

Step 3 - crayon texture rubbing

Crayon Texture Rubbing

After outlining with marker, add a texture rubbing to each area. You can use regular crayons or crayon cookies, which are melted crayons (a great way to recycle old crayons). You can see how to make crayon cookies in this blog post.

Keep in mind, texture rubbings also work well with peeled broken crayons.  

 

Texture Plates

I used Fiskars texture plates to make the texture rubbings, but other brands will work as well. 

Did you know, you can even make your texture rubbing plates?

Here are some ways to make texture rubbing plates:

 

For the best results, choose a contrasting color from the marker outline. 

In this example, I chose color complements for the most contrast:

 

Color Complements

Red & Green
Yellow & Purple
Blue & Orange
 
Here is a lesson on teaching Contrasting Colors which includes color complements.
 
 
 
 

 

Step 4 - brush with water
 

Brush Your Picasso Art Project With Water

 
After outlining each area with a colored marker, go over the marker lines with water.
 

For the best results:

  • Paint one area at a time (not the whole page).
  • Make sure the marker lines get wet.
  • Be GENTLE with the brush (use just the tip).
  • Work the color into the center gently by going over the area several times.
  • Keep in mind you can always add a little watercolor to the center of each area.
 
 

Finished!

Now, admire your finished Picasso art project!!

Want to Learn More?

Making Texture Plates:

Texture Blog Posts

mannequin standing next to a white frame with the 3 rules to break inside the frame
Click on the image to get your free download of this infographic!

This infographic is a good reminder that kids, especially reluctant drawers, are in a special place that requires nurturing from their art teachers to cultivate confidence and a love of drawing. This is the perfect time to celebrate their ideas more than their technique and reward their efforts more than their finished product.

You can read more about 3 Rules to Break to Encourage Reluctant Drawers in this blog post.


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Don’t forget to pin this!

A face drawn in the style of Pablo Picasso. The face is a woman's head with long hair. The eyes are mismatched and there is a line running down the middle of the face. The face has a marker outline around each shape, a texture rubbing inside each shape, and a watercolor resist over the texture rubbing. The text says, "Roll & Draw Picasso Face Step-by-Step Demo".
Stacey Peters

Stacey Peters

I create engaging drawing resources that help students build confidence and express themselves through art. I'm a former elementary art teacher of 25 years turned business owner. Giving you the tools you need to bring more drawing into your classroom brings me joy.

2 Responses

  1. Yes, it's important to have paper that isn't too absorbent. 80-903 drawing paper works the best for me. Also, it's important that you get the marker wet. If you didn't use the right paper or if your marker isn't bleeding well, you can alway add a little watercolor. Another trick is to rub the marker on a shiny surface, such as a plastic lid, then use a wet brush to "pick up" the color and paint with it.

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