Getting Students to Self-Assess in Art

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A boy leaning, on one hand, looking up in the air.  He is writing with the other hand and looks lost in thought. The text says, "Art Assessments with Writing".

How Do You Get Students to Self-Assess?

Sample Assessments with Writing

Using Smiley Faces

In the first sample, students self-assess by coloring in the smiley faces using two different criteria.  In Expressive Monkey’s Rubric Kit, you can edit this rubric to use your choice of criteria.  You could even get students’ input about what criteria would be best to assess.  Once students have self-assessed, they are asked to write a short explanation about what they thought they achieved at that level of performance.

When the assessment tool looks less intimidating, students are more likely to use it and give you good information.  

Having Students Write

In the second example, students are asked to explain what they did best and what they still need to work on. There is also a small name label under the rubric.  You can edit the name of the project on the label and have students fill out their own names.

Adding Your Own Questions

The third assessment is very similar to the previous one, however, the questions are editable.  There is a sample of this assessment in Ppt along with some suggestions for questions that would work.
Students will write learning goals in the last sample assessment.  Students will need to write the learning goals before beginning each step of the project.  After finishing each step of the project, they will assess how they did.

How Do Students Know What Each Level of Performance Looks Like?

Levels of Performance

As a class, you can look at each level of performance by putting one of these sheets on the board for each style of face you are using in your rubric. Let students give you input about what each level might look like. You can have students come to the board and write in a reminder of what it would look like (if the class agrees that it would be an appropriate indication of something that fits that level of performance).

Sample of Rubric and Levels of Performance

Keep these sheets on the board as students are creating their art and refer to them at the beginning of class so students can evaluate how they are doing and set a goal to achieve a high level of performance.

Conclusion

You can get students to self-assess by asking questions in the rubric that students can answer in writing. Using emojis is a fun way for students to self-assess but doesn’t always give you much information. Defining each performance level ahead of time will help students know which face to choose. Including an area for writing will give you the information you need to see how students really did and what they learned.

Questions

  • Do you go over the rubric at the start of the project?
  • Are you currently asking students to self-assess?
  • How can you include writing in your assessments?

Would You Like to Learn More?

You can read some ideas about how to use these sheets in my post about Getting Students Involved in Assessment.


You might also be interested in reading:
Assessing the Thought Process

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A boy leaning, on one hand, looking up in the air. He is writing with the other hand and looks lost in thought. The text says, "Art Assessments with Writing".
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Stacey Peters

Stacey Peters

I create engaging drawing resources that help students build confidence and express themselves through art. I'm a former elementary art teacher of 25 years turned business owner. Giving you the tools you need to bring more drawing into your classroom brings me joy.

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